Boundaries of Georgia

Boundaries of Georgia

The boundary lines that define the state of Georgia are significant for a variety of reasons, such as ownership of physical territory, jurisdiction for the state's laws, and the state's rights within the federal system. The determination of Georgia's boundaries over time has been fraught with conflict, controversy, and uncertainty.
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Siege of Savannah

Siege of Savannah

The siege of Savannah, the second deadliest battle of the Revolutionary War (1775-83), took place in the fall of 1779. It was the most serious military confrontation in Georgia between British and Continental (American revolutionary) troops, as the Americans, with help from French forces, tried unsuccessfully to liberate the city from its yearlong occupation by the British.
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Submit an Idea

Submit an Idea

Got an idea for a post or article? Do you know something about Georgia history or have expertise you can write about? We'd love to hear from you!Got an idea for a post or article? Do you know something about Georgia history or have expertise you can write about? We'd love to hear from you!

League of Women Voters of Georgia

League of Women Voters of Georgia

The League of Women Voters of Georgia, headquartered in Atlanta, describes itself as a "nonpartisan political organization" and has a long history of educating voters, promoting involvement in the political system, and advocating for equality and fairness in Georgia government.
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Flint River Farms Resettlement Community

Flint River Farms Resettlement Community

The Flint River Farms Resettlement Community in Macon County, named for the Flint River, which flows nearby, was one of several experimental planned communities established in 1937, during the Great Depression, under U.S. president Franklin D.
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Eliza Ann Grier (1864-1902)

Eliza Ann Grier (1864-1902)

Eliza Ann Grier was the first African American woman licensed to practice medicine in the state of Georgia. Born into slavery, Grier exceeded the cultural and social confines for black women in the late nineteenth century.
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DeForest Kelley (1920-1999)

DeForest Kelley (1920-1999)

Georgia native DeForest Kelley was an actor best known for his role as Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy in the Star Trek television series and feature films.
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Augustin Smith Clayton (1783-1839)

Augustin Smith Clayton (1783-1839)

Augustin Smith Clayton was a politician and jurist of national significance in the early nineteenth century. Both Clayton County and the town of Clayton, the seat of Rabun County, are named in his honor, as are major streets in Athens and Lawrenceville.
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William Burnham Woods (1824-1887)

William Burnham Woods (1824-1887)

William Burnham Woods, an Ohio native, was a Georgia resident at the time of his appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. His circuitous route to the Peach State, coupled with his numerous previous addresses, has led other states to claim him as their own. In the end, however, it is a battle over a limited legacy, for Woods's short tenure on the Court, from 1881 to 1887, was workmanlike at best and had little long-term historical impact.
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Sidney Root (1824-1897)

Sidney Root (1824-1897)

One of early Atlanta's most prominent merchants, Sidney Root played several high-stakes roles in service to the Confederacy during the Civil War (1861-65) and focused the attention of the international business community on Atlanta. His public life also included developing greenspace in Atlanta and pioneering forest conservation in Georgia, as well as advocating higher education for African Americans and religious training for both blacks and whites.
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